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Leadership and the art of plate spinning

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  • Dan Swanson
      Leadership and the art of plate spinning Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.
    Message 1 of 10 , 24 Oct, 2013
       

      Leadership and the art of plate spinning

      Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

      November 2012 | byColin Price
       
      I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.
       
      What makes this problem particularly challenging is a number of paradoxes, many of them rooted in the eccentricity and unpredictability of human behavior, about how organizations really tick. Appealing as it is to believe that the workplace is economically rational, in reality it is not. As my colleague Scott Keller and I explained in our 2011 book, Beyond Performance,1 1. See Scott Keller and Colin Price, Beyond Performance: How Great Organizations Build Ultimate Competitive Advantage, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2011; and “Organizational health: The ultimate competitive advantage,” mckinseyquarterly.com, June 2011. a decade’s worth of data derived from more than 700 companies strongly suggests that the rational way to achieve superior performance—focusing on its financial and operational manifestations by pursuing multiple short-term revenue-generating initiatives and meeting tough individual targets—may not be the most effective one.
       
      Rather, our research shows that the most successful organizations, over the long term, consistently focus on “enabling” things (leadership, purpose, employee motivation) whose immediate benefits aren’t always clear. These healthy organizations, as we call them, are internally aligned around a clear vision and strategy; can execute to a high quality thanks to strong capabilities, management processes, and employee motivation; and renew themselves more effectively than their rivals do. In short, health today drives performance tomorrow.
       
      Regards.
      Dan
      Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
      "Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent
      direction, and skillful execution; it presents the wise choice of many alternatives." 
      - W. Foster.

      Linkedin Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=646481&trk=tab_pro
      email: dswanson_2008@...


    • Dan Swanson
        Leadership and the art of plate spinning Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 7 12:14 PM
         

        Leadership and the art of plate spinning

        Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

        November 2012| byColin Price
         
        Regards. 
        Dan
        Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
        “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things".- Deming.
        Author of "Swanson on Internal Auditing: Raising the Bar!"
        http://www.itgovernanceusa.com/product/249.aspx



      • Dan Swanson
        Leadership and the art of plate spinning Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.
        Message 3 of 10 , 23 Jun, 2015

          Leadership and the art of plate spinning

          Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

           
          Regards.
          Dan
          Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
          “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things".- Deming.
        • Dan Swanson
          Leadership and the art of plate spinning Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.
          Message 4 of 10 , 14 Oct, 2015

            Collaborating With Your Customer During Your Sales Process

            Leadership and the art of plate spinning

            Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.


            I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.

            Regards.
            Dan
            Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
            “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things".- Deming.

          • Dan Swanson
            Leadership and the art of plate spinning Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.
            Message 5 of 10 , 14 Jan, 2016

              Leadership and the art of plate spinning

              Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

               
              I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.
              What makes this problem particularly challenging is a number of paradoxes, many of them rooted in the eccentricity and unpredictability of human behavior, about how organizations really tick. Appealing as it is to believe that the workplace is economically rational, in reality it is not. As my colleague Scott Keller and I explained in our 2011 book, Beyond Performance,1 a decade’s worth of data derived from more than 700 companies strongly suggests that the rational way to achieve superior performance—focusing on its financial and operational manifestations by pursuing multiple short-term revenue-generating initiatives and meeting tough individual targets—may not be the most effective one.
              Rather, our research shows that the most successful organizations, over the long term, consistently focus on “enabling” things (leadership, purpose, employee motivation) whose immediate benefits aren’t always clear. These healthy organizations, as we call them, are internally aligned around a clear vision and strategy; can execute to a high quality thanks to strong capabilities, management processes, and employee motivation; and renew themselves more effectively than their rivals do. In short, health today drives performance tomorrow.
              Regards.
              Dan
              Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
              “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. 
              Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things" - Deming.
              Governance - Its Role in Building Company Resilience Capacity (workshop)
              Shareholder Actions in Cyber Security (workshop)
            • Dan Swanson
              Leadership and the art of plate spinning Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.
              Message 6 of 10 , 22 Jan, 2016

                25FB8B3B-595D-467A-A2BA-AF36DB623CF0.jpg

                Leadership and the art of plate spinning

                Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.


                I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.
                What makes this problem particularly challenging is a number of paradoxes, many of them rooted in the eccentricity and unpredictability of human behavior, about how organizations really tick. Appealing as it is to believe that the workplace is economically rational, in reality it is not. As my colleague Scott Keller and I explained in our 2011 book, Beyond Performance,1 a decade’s worth of data derived from more than 700 companies strongly suggests that the rational way to achieve superior performance—focusing on its financial and operational manifestations by pursuing multiple short-term revenue-generating initiatives and meeting tough individual targets—may not be the most effective one.
                Regards.
                Dan
                Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
                We are what we repeatedly do.Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit. Aristotle
                Shareholder Actions in Cyber Security (workshop)
              • Dan Swanson
                Leadership and the art of plate spinning Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.
                Message 7 of 10 , 18 Apr, 2016


                  Leadership and the art of plate spinning

                  Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

                   
                  I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.
                  What makes this problem particularly challenging is a number of paradoxes, many of them rooted in the eccentricity and unpredictability of human behavior, about how organizations really tick. Appealing as it is to believe that the workplace is economically rational, in reality it is not. As my colleague Scott Keller and I explained in our 2011 book, Beyond Performance,1 a decade’s worth of data derived from more than 700 companies strongly suggests that the rational way to achieve superior performance—focusing on its financial and operational manifestations by pursuing multiple short-term revenue-generating initiatives and meeting tough individual targets—may not be the most effective one.
                  Rather, our research shows that the most successful organizations, over the long term, consistently focus on “enabling” things (leadership, purpose, employee motivation) whose immediate benefits aren’t always clear. These healthy organizations, as we call them, are internally aligned around a clear vision and strategy; can execute to a high quality thanks to strong capabilities, management processes, and employee motivation; and renew themselves more effectively than their rivals do. In short, health today drives performance tomorrow.
                  Regards.
                  Dan
                  Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
                  “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. 
                  Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things" - Deming.
                • Dan Swanson
                  Leadership and the art of plate spinning#yiv2509621224 -- #yiv2509621224ygrp-mkp {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px 0;padding:0
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 8
                    Leadership and the art of plate spinning

                    Senior executives will better balance people and priorities 

                    by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

                     
                    I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.
                    What makes this problem particularly challenging is a number of paradoxes, many of them rooted in the eccentricity and unpredictability of human behavior, about how organizations really tick. Appealing as it is to believe that the workplace is economically rational, in reality it is not. As my colleague Scott Keller and I explained in our 2011 book, Beyond Performance,1 a decade’s worth of data derived from more than 700 companies strongly suggests that the rational way to achieve superior performance—focusing on its financial and operational manifestations by pursuing multiple short-term revenue-generating initiatives and meeting tough individual targets—may not be the most effective one.
                    Rather, our research shows that the most successful organizations, over the long term, consistently focus on “enabling” things (leadership, purpose, employee motivation) whose immediate benefits aren’t always clear. These healthy organizations, as we call them, are internally aligned around a clear vision and strategy; can execute to a high quality thanks to strong capabilities, management processes, and employee motivation; and renew themselves more effectively than their rivals do. In short, health today drives performance tomorrow.
                    Regards.
                    Dan
                    Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
                    “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. 
                    Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things" - Deming.
                  • Dan Swanson
                    blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 14
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                      Leadership and the art of plate spinning

                      Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

                       
                      I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.
                      What makes this problem particularly challenging is a number of paradoxes, many of them rooted in the eccentricity and unpredictability of human behavior, about how organizations really tick. Appealing as it is to believe that the workplace is economically rational, in reality it is not. As my colleague Scott Keller and I explained in our 2011 book, Beyond Performance,1 a decade’s worth of data derived from more than 700 companies strongly suggests that the rational way to achieve superior performance—focusing on its financial and operational manifestations by pursuing multiple short-term revenue-generating initiatives and meeting tough individual targets—may not be the most effective one.
                      Rather, our research shows that the most successful organizations, over the long term, consistently focus on “enabling” things (leadership, purpose, employee motivation) whose immediate benefits aren’t always clear. These healthy organizations, as we call them, are internally aligned around a clear vision and strategy; can execute to a high quality thanks to strong capabilities, management processes, and employee motivation; and renew themselves more effectively than their rivals do. In short, health today drives performance tomorrow.
                      Regards.
                      Dan
                      Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
                      “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. 
                      Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things" - Deming.






                    • Dan Swanson
                      Leadership and the art of plate spinning#yiv2073170425 -- #yiv2073170425ygrp-mkp {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px 0;padding:0
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 26
                        Leadership and the art of plate spinning

                        Senior executives will better balance people and priorities by embracing the paradoxes of organizational life.

                         
                        I often ask business leaders three simple questions. What are your company’s ten most exciting value-creation opportunities? Who are your ten best people? How many of your ten best people are working on your ten most exciting opportunities? It’s a rough and ready exercise, to be sure. But the answer to the last question—typically, no more than six—is usually expressed with ill-disguised frustration that demonstrates how difficult it is for senior executives to achieve organizational alignment.
                        What makes this problem particularly challenging is a number of paradoxes, many of them rooted in the eccentricity and unpredictability of human behavior, about how organizations really tick. Appealing as it is to believe that the workplace is economically rational, in reality it is not. As my colleague Scott Keller and I explained in our 2011 book, Beyond Performance,1 a decade’s worth of data derived from more than 700 companies strongly suggests that the rational way to achieve superior performance—focusing on its financial and operational manifestations by pursuing multiple short-term revenue-generating initiatives and meeting tough individual targets—may not be the most effective one.
                        Rather, our research shows that the most successful organizations, over the long term, consistently focus on “enabling” things (leadership, purpose, employee motivation) whose immediate benefits aren’t always clear. These healthy organizations, as we call them, are internally aligned around a clear vision and strategy; can execute to a high quality thanks to strong capabilities, management processes, and employee motivation; and renew themselves more effectively than their rivals do. In short, health today drives performance tomorrow.
                        Regards.
                        Dan
                        Dan Swanson and Associates, Ltd.
                        “It is not enough to do your best, you must know what to do and then do your best. 
                        Does experience help? No! Not if we are doing the wrong things" - Deming.
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