Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

15656RE: [gaiapc] Muslim children are being spoon‑fed misogyny | The Times

Expand Messages
  • Madeline Weld
    29 Nov, 2017

      The British educations inspection agency Ofsted launched an investigation called Trojan Horse to investigate Salafist takeovers of some Islamic schools. Given that things got bad enough for the Brits to do that, finding misogynistic material in British Muslim schools should not come as a huge surprise.

       

      Madeline

       

      From: gaiapc@... [mailto:gaiapc@...]
      Sent: November 29, 2017 9:42 AM
      To: gaiapc@...
      Subject: Re: [gaiapc] Muslim children are being spoon‑fed misogyny | The Times

       

       

      What possible use of the books in the classrooms can you imagine other than the reading of them by some humans, even if by the teachers reading them outloud? Are the pages just expensive toilet paper? ;-)

       

      BTW, I wager for charity on probabilities; certainty has nothing to do with that. Veracity refers to accuracy of the reporting.

       

      Cheers on the Portside!

       

      Steve



      On Nov 29, 2017, at 9:29 AM, Jada Thacker jadathacker@... [gaiapc] <gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

       

      The Times article claims that certain books contain questionable material, but gives no evidence that the material in question is actually taught to children, or that children actually read those books.

       

      I am not questioning whether the material exists in the books as reported, but rather why no evidence is advanced to support the inference that the material is actually taught. It's a fair question. In any event, my expression of skepticism does not constitute an "attack" on anybody, much less an "ad hominem fallacy."

       

      You may put your money on the veracity of today's journalism you wish, but I read somewhere that "certainty is absurd."  

       

      Jada 

       

      On Wednesday, November 29, 2017 7:37 AM, "Steve Kurtz kurtzs@... [gaiapc]" <gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

       

      So, Jada, you accuse the Times of London publishing falsehoods? My money is on the verity of the article. Why don’t you challenge the Times with your claim? 

       

      In any case, young children are impressionable and have insufficient experience to challenge their teachers. They are taught to respect and honor them. Asking the brainwashed to critique the experience *after* the events is like pissing into the wind!

       

      If you can refute the article, please do so. Attacking it with zero evidence is an ad hominem fallacy.

       

      Steve



      On Nov 29, 2017, at 8:17 AM, Jada Thacker jadathacker@... [gaiapc] <gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

       

      The first thing it would would do is help verify that the article is not a heap of hysterical rubbish.

       

      Jada

       

      On Wednesday, November 29, 2017 2:54 AM, "Helmut L helmut.lubbers@... [gaiapc]" <gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

       

      What would be the use? Kids mostly obey.

      Le 29 nov. 2017 06:19, "Jada Thacker jadathacker@... [gaiapc]" <gaiapc@...> a écrit :

       

      Did anybody interview any of the children who attended this school to find out what they thought about what they supposedly were taught?

       

      No? Wonder why not.

       

      Jada

       

       

       

      On Tuesday, November 28, 2017 7:02 PM, "Luis Gutierrez ltg4263@... [gaiapc]" <gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

       

      I feel equally bad.  All religions have been used by some to manipulate and exploit people, to justify atrocities, etc.  Religious intolerance is always bad.  Nothing human is 100% pure, and organized religion is no exception.  


      Luis

       

      On Tue, Nov 28, 2017 at 5:24 PM, Steve Kurtz kurtzs@... [gaiapc] <gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

      How do you feel about the Christian (many Catholic) missionaries who yanked Inuit, Native American, Aboriginal, African…children from their homes, native cultures and languages, and put them in religious schools, and punished them if they spoke their native language, etc?

       

      Steve



      On Nov 28, 2017, at 4:03 PM, Luis Gutierrez ltg4263@gmailcom [gaiapc] <gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

       

      Disgraceful.  Hope global communications will shorten the longevity of this kind of indoctrination


      Luis

       

      On Tue, Nov 28, 2017 at 8:12 AM, Steve Kurtz kurtzs@... [gaiapc] < gaiapc@...> wrote:

       

       

      excerpt

      Inspectors are so concerned by what they have found in some Muslim schools that they have started compiling a detailed list of the worst examples of misogyny, homophobia and antisemitism. One school library had on its shelves a book called Women Who Deserve to Go to Hell that singles out for criticism those who show “ingratitude to husband” or “have tall ambitions” as well as “mischievous” females who “are a trial for men”. In its pages, pupils were instructed that: “In the beginning of the 20th century, a movement for the freedom of women was launched with the basic objective of driving women towards aberrant ways.”

      Children at another school were encouraged to study a text contrasting the “noble woman of the East” who protects her modesty by wearing a veil and the “internally torn woman of the West”, who “leaves her home to knock about aimlessly in cinemas and cafés, malls and bazaars, parks and theatres, exhibitions and circuses”. There were also school library books insisting that “the wife is not allowed to refuse sex to her husband” or “leave the house where she lives without his permission” and that “the man by way of correction can also beat her”.

       

       

      Muslim children are being spoon‑fed misogyny

      Rachel Sylvester November 28 2017, 12:01am,

      ‘Thus man is definitely master of the woman”, states rule number one on the checklist for children in a book kept in the library at one Islamic school. It’s part of a shocking dossier of material uncovered by Ofsted inspectors on recent visits to faith-based institutions in both the private and state sector.

      While most institutions are moderate, some do not promote British valuesClara Molden/Times Newspapers Ltd

      Photographs of texts in the school libraries as well as examples of pupils’ own work — which I have seen — raise serious questions about the government’s campaign to uphold so-called “British values” in the education system.

      Despite promising to defend equality, tolerance and mutual respect in schools as part of the drive against extremism, ministers appear to be turning a blind eye to taxpayers’ money being used to promote the idea that girls are inferior to boys.

      Inspectors are so concerned by what they have found in some Muslim schools that they have started compiling a detailed list of the worst examples of misogyny, homophobia and antisemitism. One school library had on its shelves a book called Women Who Deserve to Go to Hell that singles out for criticism those who show “ingratitude to husband” or “have tall ambitions” as well as “mischievous” females who “are a trial for men”. In its pages, pupils were instructed that: “In the beginning of the 20th century, a movement for the freedom of women was launched with the basic objective of driving women towards aberrant ways.”

      Children at another school were encouraged to study a text contrasting the “noble woman of the East” who protects her modesty by wearing a veil and the “internally torn woman of the West”, who “leaves her home to knock about aimlessly in cinemas and cafés, malls and bazaars, parks and theatres, exhibitions and circuses”. There were also school library books insisting that “the wife is not allowed to refuse sex to her husband” or “leave the house where she lives without his permission” and that “the man by way of correction can also beat her”.

      Perhaps not surprisingly, the social attitudes contained in the library books had filtered through to the children’s work. Ofsted inspectors were taken aback to see one student’s answers on a worksheet suggesting that women have a responsibility “only to bear children and bring them up as Muslims” while men should be “protectors of women”. In a box entitled “daily life and relationships” the pupil had written that men are “physically stronger” and women are “emotionally weaker”. The worksheet was covered in approving red ticks from the teacher. An essay argued that: “Men are stronger and can work full time since they don’t need to look after the children. Some people disagree that men and women are equal. Paternitity [sic] is an unconvinience [sic].” Men should also “earn more as they have families to support” and “are physically stronger so are better at being engineers and builders”, the student concluded. Yet ministers seem reluctant to act and are in fact encouraging the creation of more religious schools.

      I realise this is a controversial subject at a time when Islamophobia is on the rise, but it cannot be ignored because girls deserve to be treated as equals, whatever their faith and however they are educated in our liberal democracy. There are 177 Muslim schools in England, of which 148 are independent, and the rest state-funded (16 free schools, 10 voluntary aided and three academies). Of course, the vast majority of these institutions are moderate and many are also high-performing. But Ofsted is increasingly concerned about the cultural values being promoted in some of them. Of the 139 independent Islamic schools inspected since 2015 (when the inspectorate was given responsibility for private faith schools) 57 per cent have been rated less than good, compared to 11 per cent of all schools, and many of these were marked down because of a failure to uphold British values.

      Last month Ofsted won a landmark court ruling that religious schools could no longer segregate boys and girls. Inspectors are now planning to question Muslim girls who wear the hijab at primary school, because most Islamic teaching does not require girls to cover their heads until they reach puberty. An investigation is also being launched into a reported rise in the number of girls forbidden from taking swimming lessons in order to preserve their modesty.

      Meanwhile, without much help from the government, Ofsted is trying to deal with the growing problem of illegal unregistered schools, teaching potentially thousands of children in a totally unregulated setting. Inspectors have already issued warning notices to 45 of them and a further 100 are under active investigation.

      Earlier this year, Amanda Spielman, the chief inspector, argued that the terrorist attacks in Westminster, London Bridge and Manchester demonstrated the need to do more to promote fundamental British values in schools. “Just as important as our physical safety is making sure that young people have the knowledge and resilience they need to resist extremism,” she said.

      The education system is a window into a nation’s soul and yet Dame Louise Casey, whose report on integration was published a year ago, says the appalling material contained in the Ofsted dossier is not just a few “isolated” examples. “Some schools are teaching a segregated way of life and misogyny, and the government isn’t taking enough of a stand,” she told me yesterday. “The Department for Education turns a blind eye and hopes that Ofsted will deal with the problem. It’s all in the ‘too difficult’ box.” In her view the government should impose a moratorium on the creation of any more minority faith schools “until we have made sure that all faith schools in this country are teaching the equalities we expect”.

      This is not just about values but also national security. Since Dame Louise’s report was published last December there have been four Islamist-inspired terrorist attacks and numerous other plots foiled, but the government has still not implemented a single one of her recommendations. “I’m disappointed and genuinely concerned about the wellbeing of the country,” she said. “If we don’t make everybody feel they are part of the same country then I think worse things come out of that. We have got to fight these battles on all fronts and at the moment we are not.”

      Distracted by Brexit and divided between feuding ministers, the government has yet again taken its eye off the ball. Politics has become all about culture wars — between Leavers and Remainers, or feminists and transgender campaigners, centrist dads and Corbynistas — but the biggest battle of ideas, the one David Cameron called the “struggle of a generation”, is being dangerously ignored.

      You are logged in as a registered user

      Previous article

      It’s OK to beat your wife, says Islamic school book

      Next article

      Drivers warned to beware icy roads

       

      —————————————

      Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.
      Voltaire (1770)

       

       

       

       

       

      —————————————

      Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.
      Voltaire (1770)

       

       

       

       

       

       

      —————————————

      Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.
      Voltaire (1770)

       

       

       

       

      —————————————

      Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.
      Voltaire (1770)

       

    • Show all 14 messages in this topic